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Methven farmer used lead shot to kill protected water fowl on duck season opening day

文字:[大][中][小] 2018/09/25     Views:10    

Methven farmer used lead shot to kill protected water fowl on duck season opening day

A New Zealand scaup, commonly known as a black teal. (File photo)

A Methven farmer killed more than a dozen protected water fowl on the opening day of duck shooting season.

Glen Colin Webber, 46, appeared in the Alexandra District Court on Tuesday on charges relating to the fatal shooting of eight grey teal and eight New Zealand scaup, wounding one scaup, and firing lead cartridges, in Ranfurly, Central Otago, on May 5.

Judge Michael Crosbie said the case served as a reminder to hunters to correctly identify protected species before shooting.

Otago Fish and Game rangers spotted the dead birds on a farm on Wedderburn highway about 8.45am. The rangers were visiting hunters in the area to ensure they were complying with the rules on the opening day of duck shooting season.
The Wedderburn farm had three maimai on a pond, two of which contained two 12-gauge shotguns. The rangers also found boxes of lead shot cartridges and spent lead shot shells in two of the maimai.

Webber told the rangers he had shot about 20 birds and had mistakenly identified the protected species as other game birds. He said all birds looked the same in half-light and he had looked up the various species on the internet during the morning, but a safety briefing did not include any discussion about species identification, the court heard.

Webber admitted he had shot some of the New Zealand scaup and some of the grey teal. He had planned to leave them in the pond, he said.

The use of lead shot is prohibited while hunting within 200 metres of open water with any gun using a 12-gauge cartridge. Webber had 250 lead shot cartridges and had used about one third of the cartridges found at the pond.

Webber told the rangers he had purchased all of the lead shot, but had thought it was steel because the boxes were marked SP, which he thought stood for steel pellets.
Webber was convicted and ordered to pay $2500 in fines and $1187 costs. His guns were also forfeited.

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